BitFive: Now with multitouch

This is only a small thing out of everything I need to make/finish/release in next months, but...
So there is now multi-touch support in openfl-bitfive, which is an alternative OpenFL HTML5 backend with focus on blitting and compatibility across platforms.
Usage is identical to Flash/AIR - you add an according event listener to your desired DisplayObject, and handle the TouchEvent objects it catches:

stage.addEventListener(TouchEvent.TOUCH_BEGIN, function(e) {
	trace("Touched at (" + e.stageX + ", " + e.stageY + ")");
});

And, same as it goes for mouse events, the rest is handled behind the scenes - events are routed automatically, and you don't need to worry about browsers and devices with partial or glitchy support.
You can even have your mouse events converted into touch events for ease of testing if you want (see bitfive_mouseTouches flag).

Addition is already live at both repository and haxelib, there's a demo available (probably want to view it from mobile device), and this post contains some extra details on what it took.
Also, if you needed this for some time, you can pretty much thank Ozdy (which is also the largest supporter of backend) for suggesting the feature.

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Haxe: Simplistic .properties parser

If you have ever been using Java, you may already be familiar with .properties file format. This is a simplistic configuration file format, somewhat similar to INI:

# Comment
key = Value

For ones not liking that, there's also alternative syntax:

! Comment
key: Value

Where leading/trailing spaces are optional and are trimmed in parsing process.

Since I've seen people ask about this kind of thing, and also have seen people invent ridiculous (and non-functional) regular expressions to parse this file format, I thought that I may as well make an implementation that works "just right".

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On “You can’t make good HTML5 games in Haxe”

You can't make good HTML5 games in Haxe

- A phrase usually popping up when it comes to a discussion about HTML5 and Haxe. Which is complete nonsense. Not just that it is nonsense, but it's also a good measure of how little (read: none) research the author of phrase has made on the topic. I'm quite tired explaining to people, why their opinion about this is incorrect, so I've decided to group key points into a post,

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Introducing: OpenFL-bitfive

OpenFL-bitfive logo

Today I'm officially releasing OpenFL-bitfive, an alternative backend to OpenFL-html5. Similar to standard backend, OpenFL-bitfive assists you at creating HTML5 games (apart of standard Flash, Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, iOS, [...] ones) with use of comfortable Flash-like OpenFL API. A difference is that while focusing only on certain feature set, OpenFL-bitfive reaches quite higher performance and compatibility in its niche, also making it possible to develop mobile HTML5 games using the framework. This post goes in-depth about it.

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Haxe: migrating For-loops

Migrating from C-styled for-loops to Haxe for-loops

If you are migrating to Haxe (or just porting an existing application) from another C-like language, such as JavaScript or ActionScript, you may have already noticed that for-loops in Haxe differ a bit from standard format that you would expect to see in languages of this type. To be precise, they lack common 3-statement format support. This article is dedicated to different methods of "migrating" your for-loops without rewriting contents entirely.

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Haxe: Replacing NME/Browser (Jeash)

If you are working with HaxeNME, you might have noticed that compiled JS/HTML5 applications do not necessary work same as other platforms. Or don't work at all. Or don't compile because of some uncommon unimplemented method that you've used.
Reasons of such behaviour are even somewhat understandable - process of recreating Flash API on JavaScript+HTML5 isn't exactly an easy task, especially since multiple features do not exist in both of two in the same way or do not exist in second at all, meaning that implementation may require a trick or two to work.
And as code base is accumulating "tricks" by multiple contributors, it does not necessarily remain entirely stable.
For example, if you've decided to clear your BitmapData-based 640x480 buffer via BitmapData.fillRect, you are making a huge mistake - the function is not just doing this pixel-by-pixel, but also via ImageData API.
Overall, this article is dedicated to substituting Browser/Jeash part of NME by your own library in JS compilation.

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